Why a Common-place?

Common-place is a common place for exploring and exchanging ideas about early American history and culture. A bit less formal than a scholarly journal, a bit more scholarly than a popular magazine, Common-place speaks—and listens—to scholars, museum curators, teachers, hobbyists, and just about anyone interested in American history before 1900. Common-place is a common place for all sorts of people to read about all sorts of things relating to early American life—from architecture to literature, from politics to parlor manners. It’s a place to find insightful analysis of early American history as it is discussed in scholarly literature, as it manifests on the evening news, as it is curated in museums, big and small; as it is performed in documentary and dramatic films and as it shows up in everyday life.

Our features, reviews, and columns track the lives of ordinary men and women, embracing new scholarship, teaching, poetry, and exhibits that explore all aspects of America’s past and its many peoples.

Common-place publishes four full issues and three interim issues per year.