H. J. Lewis, Free man and Freeman artist

Presented as part of the Special Issue: “Revolution in Print: Graphics in Nineteenth-Century America”

What would it be like to start off in life as a severely handicapped slave?

Imitation is the Sincerest Form of Appropriation

Presented as part of the Special Issue: “Revolution in Print: Graphics in Nineteenth-Century America”

. . . scrapbooks created to save newspaper and magazine items often used few of the pictures from those publications. Perhaps pictures undercut the seriousness of a homemade object that mimicked the look of a book or newspaper.

“Ho for Salt River!”

Presented as part of the Special Issue: “Revolution in Print: Graphics in Nineteenth-Century America”

Several cartoons from the presidential campaign of 1848 show Salt River as a foreboding obstacle for all who seek the nation’s highest office.

Face Value

Presented as part of the Special Issue: “Revolution in Print: Graphics in Nineteenth-Century America”

It was far less labor intensive—and therefore less expensive—for a painter or engraver to render a head than a full figure posed against an elaborate background.

It was far less labor intensive—and therefore less expensive—for a painter or engraver to render a head than a full figure posed against an elaborate background.

The Dickinsons of Amherst Collect

Presented as part of the Special Issue: “Revolution in Print: Graphics in Nineteenth-Century America”

. . . assemblages of pictures in domestic installations—sometimes described as home altars—allow for the creation of a dream world or alternative visual environment from which the viewer can derive a complex web of meanings.

Engaging Urban Panoramas

Presented as part of the Special Issue: “Revolution in Print: Graphics in Nineteenth-Century America”

Because antebellum northern cities could be worrisome and puzzling, exactly because they were so incontestably changeful, and perhaps also because, as a result, urban vistas departed so dramatically from the iconic, reassuring visions of rural America—for such reasons, there was a generalized desire, indeed a broadly felt necessity, to develop firmer understandings of the urban milieu.

Picturesque California

Presented as part of the Special Issue: “Revolution in Print: Graphics in Nineteenth-Century America”

“Visions of ineffable beauty and harmony, health and exhilaration of body and soul, and grand foundation lessons in Nature’s eternal love, are the sure reward of every earnest looker in this glorious wilderness.”—John Muir

“Reading” Portrait Prints

Presented as part of the Special Issue: “Revolution in Print: Graphics in Nineteenth-Century America”

By changing the head, the coat, and the background building, the publisher could quickly produce a dignified presidential image with all the expected components of high office.

Photography in Engraving on Wood

Presented as part of the Special Issue: “Revolution in Print: Graphics in Nineteenth-Century America”

Photographs did eventually replace wood engravings in illustration, but before that photography joined and transformed wood engraving so as to favor its claims as a fine art.

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